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The Wild Animal Rescue Centre Lopuri
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The Wild Animal Rescue Centre and Lopburi Monkey Hospital

The Wild Animal Rescue Center and The Lopburi Monkey Hospital takes in wild animals, many of which arrive in appalling conditions, confiscated from the illegal pet and animal trade. Our primary goal is to provide shelter for the animals so that the authorities have a place to take confiscated pets and victims of the trade. We hope to enlighten the lives of these animals by providing them with a secure and caring environment. We equally hope that by providing good care to the abused apes, monkeys and bears it will encourage more action to be taken against illegal trade. In the future, we would like to be able to rehabilitate some of them. The development of a gibbon rehabilitation project is underway.

     

 

President of Chokchai Dairy Farm
donates 100,000 baht 
 

 

Privy Councillor presents an award to WARF

 

Privy Councillor General Surayudh Chulanont on behalf of his Majesty the King cutting the ribbon for opening ceremony

Location: The city of Lopburi is situated about three hours drive north from Bangkok, known as " Monkey City", due to the large number of macaques that inhabit the old quarter. Lopburi is one of Thailand's oldest cities and served as a Khmer military outpost in the 13th century and as an alternative capital to Ayutthaya in the mid 17th century. The city contains some ancient Khmer ruins and the remains of the old summer capital for Ayutthayan kings.


Concept
Since ancient times, there have been monkeys living in the San Phra Kan and Phra Prang Sam Yot. More than 1,000 monkeys have been coexisting together with humans in the society, so peacefully to the extent that the monkeys have become the symbol of Lopburi province. Each year, a number of monkeys suffer injury in car accidents, get electrocuted by accident, or are bitten by another monkey. The average casualty rate is around 10 monkeys per month. However, without a medical facility established for this purpose, these unfortunate monkeys were left to struggle on their own. The Thai and foreign tourists who visit Lopburi could only feel sorry for the monkeys in distress, but are unable to do anything to help them.

 

 

 

Since ancient times, there have been monkeys living in the San Phra Kan and Phra Prang Sam Yot. More than 1,000 monkeys have been coexisting together with humans in the society, so peacefully to the extent that the monkeys have become the symbol of Lopburi province. Each year, a number of monkeys suffer injury in car accidents, get electrocuted by accident, or are bitten by another monkey. The average casualty rate is around 10 monkeys per month. However, without a medical facility established for this purpose, these unfortunate monkeys were left to struggle on their own. The Thai and foreign tourists who visit Lopburi could only feel sorry for the monkeys in distress, but are unable to do anything to help them.

Having acknowledged the gravity of the monkeys' situation, the Wild Animal Rescue Foundation of Thailand (WARF) and the San Phra Kan Management collaborated with the people of Lopburi and various individuals and raised funds to build Thailand's first ever Monkey hospital. The Lopburi Monkey Hospital's foundation stone was laid on Mother's Day, the 12th of August 2003; and on Father's Day, the 5th of December 2003, the Hospital officially opened its doors to receive its first monkey patient. Several sick and injured monkeys received treatment from the hospital, but would encounter difficulty reintegrating themselves back into their community upon full recovery. Monkeys have short memory span, and would attack the reintroduced monkeys whom they could no longer recognize. 


Training Monkeys to Help People "Khun Jor the Social Worker"
The Wild Animal Rescue Foundation of Thailand in collaboration with the Lopburi Zoo designed a "social worker" training program for the monkeys whose health had recovered. This program serves to show that monkeys can be a model of integrity in society, such as assisting the blind in crossing the street, collecting garbage, meditation, etc. The training program is based on the principle of compassion and non-violence. Instead of a collar around the neck, a waistband is used. Instead of physical punishment for mistakes, monkeys receive tidbits as rewards for behaving correctly. Most importantly, the trainer must be very patient-the trainer would gently pat the head of an aggressive monkey to sooth him and calm him down.

Monkeys that have successfully gained these special capabilities are public relations officers for the Monkey Hospital's patients. Wherever they may be in performing their duties, these monkeys are always welcomed and received with kindness and sympathy. The Monkey Hospital still does not have adequate medical supplies and equipments, and is especially in need of an ambulance for emergency situations. A land area of 2 rai adjoining the Hospital has been set aside for purposes of physical therapy for disabled monkeys, and also serves as a rest home for elderly monkeys. (2 rai is equivalent to 3,200 square meters, or approximately 34,445 square foot, or 0.8 US acre).


Monkey Hospital opens in Lop Buri
Budget for centre to be sought from govt
Bangkok Post, 04 December 2003, Suwanna Rathavorn and Wassana Nanuam

Thailand's first hospital for monkeys was opened yesterday in Lop Buri Zoo to treat ill and injured monkeys, control epidemics, and keep track of monkey business. Lop Buri has more than 1,000 monkeys, most of whom are taking sanctuary in the compound of the Phra Karn Shrine. Many have become victims of road accidents, electrocution and communicable diseases. They even eat plastic bags left by tourists if they have to.

Yesterday's ceremony to open the Monkey Hospital in Lop Buri Zoo began at 10.30am and was presided over by privy councillor Gen Surayudh Chulanont on behalf of His Majesty the King. Veterinarian Juthamas Supanam said the hospital was established with the aim of treating ill monkeys, curb death tolls, keep statistics about monkeys' illnesses, control epidemics, and put sick animals in quarantine. The hospital's veterinarians would have to work out treatment, vaccination and anti-parasite programmes for monkeys, and operate on them if they have to, she said.

"About five monkeys are brought in for medical treatment every day. Most were involved in accidents. They were either hit by vehicles or trains, electrocuted, or bitten by dogs. Most came from Phra Karn Shrine. They had been registered with micro chips,'' she said.

Members of the hospital's medical team include Lop Buri Zoo director Col Samorn Srithandorn. It took three months and 20 days for the construction of the hospital to be completed on Dec 2 from donations totalling 775,400 baht, after the Aug 12 foundation stone laying ceremony. The hospital needs around 900,000 baht to buy medical equipment.

Those wanting to make donations can contact the Lop Buri Zoo, the Lop Buri-based special warfare centre or the Wild Animal Rescue Foundation of Thailand, or transfer the money to Monkey Hospital Fund's accounts 297-2-37336-5 at Kasikornthai Bank's Wong Wian Sa Kaeo branch and at 009-2-39661-1 at the Siam Commercial Bank's Bank Kapi branch.

Lt-Gen Sonthi Boonyarattakalin, commander of the special warfare centre, said the centre, as operator of the Lop Buri Zoo, needed a lot of cooperation from the Lop Buri residents and the Wild Animal Rescue Foundation of Thailand to open the Monkey Hospital in the zoo for treating ill monkeys, most of whom were suffering from various wounds and leprosy.

"Monkeys in Lop Buri province can be divided into three groups: Phra Karn Shrine monkeys, city monkeys who live around building corners, and jungle monkeys. They are sworn enemies and stage an all-out group war whenever they run into each other, causing injuries and infection which lead to leprosy,'' he said.

The centre was consulting Lopburi MPs how to seek a budget from the government to give monkeys a better quality of life.


Help is needed!...If you would like to contribute to this project in any way you may use the on-line donation form, or simply contact us for more information.



@ 2007 Wild Animal Rescue Foundation of Thailand. All rights reserved.
Photographs courtesy of WARF Staff and Volunteers Niether graphics nor text maybe produced wihtout WARF's express written consent
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